- A premium source of international business opportunities since 2002 Global Tenders - Home Page  Global Tenders Contact Us  Frequently asked questions      Global Tenders Sitemap
Global Tenders
Traduire le site en Français Übersetzen der Webseite in deutscher Sprache Tradurre il sito in Italiano Traduzir o site em Português Traducir la página web en Español Перевести этот веб-сайт на русском языке Oversæt din website i dansk Käännä tämä Web-sivusto, suomi Oversett dette webområdet på norsk Översätta hemsidan på svenska Vertaal deze website in het Nederlands Превођење уеб локацију на српском Przetłumacz Serwis w języku polskim Přeložit této internetové stránky v češtině Traduceţi website-ul în limba română Превод на сайта на български Μετάφραση ιστοσελίδας στην ελληνική γλώσσα Pārvērst mājas lapā latviešu Переклад сайту на українській мові תרגם אתר בעברית ترجم هذا الموقع باللغه العربية हिंदी में अनुवाद की वेबसाइट Terjemahkan website di Indonesia Isalin ang website sa Filipino このWebサイトを日本語に翻訳 한국이 웹 사이트 번역 Phiên dịch các trang web ở Việt Nam [翻译此网站在中国
Business Opportunities - Global Tenders - International Competitive Bids
Global Tenders
  • Home
  • View All Tenders
  • Categories
  • Search
  • Directory
  • TPOs/COC
  • Economies
  • Free Tenders
  • Contact
  • Publish Tenders
  • Subscribe
Global Tenders
A Premier Opportunity Platform. Gateway to a wide range of new business opportunities - both B2B and B2G.
Chamber of Commerce Trade organizations Online Business Opportunities Global Tenders World Tenders Global business directory & trade directory

 Economy of Malawi - Business Opportunities Economy Of Malawi
Global Tenders - Business Opportunities - International Competitive Bids

The economy of Malawi is predominantly agricultural, with about 90% of the population living in rural areas. The landlocked country in south central Africa ranks among the world's least developed countries. Agriculture accounts for 37% of GDP and 85% of export revenues. The economy depends on substantial inflows of economic assistance from the IMF, the World Bank, and individual donor nations. The government faces strong challenges: to spur exports, to improve educational and health facilities, to face up to environmental problems of deforestation and erosion, and to deal with the rapidly growing problem of HIV/AIDS.


Agriculture represents 36% of the GDP, accounts for over 80% of the labor force, and represents about 80% of all exports. Its most important export crop is tobacco, which accounts for about 70% of export revenues. In 2000 the country was the tenth largest producer in the world (See table). The United Nations Foreign Agricultural Office estimates the following production of unprocessed tobacco by country in 2000 (figures are in thousands of tonnes.)

The country's heavy reliance on tobacco places a heavy burden on the economy as world prices decline and the international community increases pressure to limit tobacco production. Malawi's dependence on tobacco is growing, with the product jumping from 53% to 70% of export revenues between 2007 and 2008.

The country also relies heavily on tea, sugarcane and coffee, with these three plus tobacco making up more than 90% of Malawi's export revenue. Tea was first introduced in 1878. Most of it is grown in Mulanje and Thyolo. Other crops include cotton, corn, potatoes, sorghum, cattle and goats. Tobacco and sugar processing are notable secondary industries.

Traditionally Malawi has been self-sufficient in its staple food, maize (corn), and during the 1980s it exported substantial quantities to its drought-stricken neighbors. Nearly 90% of the population engages in subsistence farming. Smallholder farmers produce a variety of crops, including maize, beans, rice, cassava, tobacco, and groundnuts (peanuts). Financial wealth is generally concentrated in the hands of a small elite. Malawi's manufacturing industries are situated around the city of Blantyre.

Malawi has few exploitable mineral resources. Malawi's economic reliance on the export of agricultural commodities renders it particularly vulnerable to external shocks such as declining terms of trade and drought. High transport costs, which can comprise over 30% of its total import bill, constitute a serious impediment to economic development and trade. Malawi must import all its fuel products. Other challenges include a pucity of skilled labor, difficulty in obtaining expatriate employment permits, bureaucratic red tape, corruption, and inadequate and deteriorating road, electricity, water, and telecommunications infrastructure which hinder economic development in Malawi. However, recent government initiatives targeting improvements in the road infrastructure, together with private sector participation in railroad and telecommunications, have begun to render the investment environment more attractive.

International support

Malawi has undertaken economic structural adjustment programs supported by the World Bank (IBRD), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), and other donors since 1981. Broad reform objectives include stimulation of private sector activity and participation through the elimination of price controls and industrial licensing, liberalization of trade and foreign exchange, rationalization of taxes, privatization of state-owned enterprises, and civil service reform. Malawi qualified for Heavily Indebted Poor Country (HIPC) debt relief and is in the process of refining its Poverty Reduction Strategy.

Real GDP grew by 3.6% in 1999 and 2.1% in 2000. The government's monetary policy has been expansionary, and the average annual inflation has hovered around 30% in 2000 and 2001, keeping discount and commercial bank rates high (the discount rate was 47% in December 2000). In the second half of 2001, the Kwacha strengthened sharply against the U.S. dollar, moving from 80 to 60.

Malawi has bilateral trade agreements with its two major trading partners, South Africa and Zimbabwe, both of which allow duty-free entry of Malawian products into their countries. The government faces challenges such as the improvement of Malawi's educational and health facilities--particularly important because of the rising rates of HIV/AIDS--and environmental problems including deforestation, erosion, and overworked soils.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Economy Of Malawi".
Advertise here
Advertise on Global Tenders
Advertise on Global Tenders
Advertise on Global Tenders
Advertise on Global Tenders
Malawi Global tenders government tenders online business opportunity Global contracts chamber of commerce World bank tenders Asian Development bank/td>
Global tenders from Malawi government tenders online business opportunity internet business opportunity Government contracts Global contracts chamber of commerce World bank tenders Asian Development bank